ScienceDaily News Feeds

  • Making AI algorithms show their work
    on May 13, 2021 at 6:24 pm

    Artificial intelligence (AI) learning machines can be trained to solve problems and puzzles on their own instead of using rules that we made for them. But often, researchers do not know what rules the machines make for themselves. A new method quizzes a machine-learning program to figure out what rules it learned on its own and if they are the right ones.

  • Making AI algorithms show their work
    on May 13, 2021 at 6:24 pm

    Artificial intelligence (AI) learning machines can be trained to solve problems and puzzles on their own instead of using rules that we made for them. But often, researchers do not know what rules the machines make for themselves. A new method quizzes a machine-learning program to figure out what rules it learned on its own and if they are the right ones.

  • Universal equation for explosive phenomena
    on May 10, 2021 at 2:43 pm

    Climate change, a pandemic or the coordinated activity of neurons in the brain: In all of these examples, a transition takes place at a certain point from the base state to a new state. Researchers have discovered a universal mathematical structure at these so-called tipping points. It creates the basis for a better understanding of the behavior of networked systems.

  • Universal equation for explosive phenomena
    on May 10, 2021 at 2:43 pm

    Climate change, a pandemic or the coordinated activity of neurons in the brain: In all of these examples, a transition takes place at a certain point from the base state to a new state. Researchers have discovered a universal mathematical structure at these so-called tipping points. It creates the basis for a better understanding of the behavior of networked systems.

  • Smartphone breath alcohol testing devices vary widely in accuracy
    on May 9, 2021 at 7:38 pm

    The latest generation of personal alcohol breath testing devices pair with smartphones. While some of these devices were found to be relatively accurate, others may mislead users into thinking that they are fit to drive, according to a new study.

  • Researchers develop artificial intelligence that can detect sarcasm in social media
    on May 7, 2021 at 3:20 pm

    Properly understanding and responding to customer feedback on social media platforms is crucial for brands, and it may have just gotten a little easier thanks to new research.

  • Quantum drum duet measured
    on May 6, 2021 at 6:20 pm

    Like conductors of a spooky symphony, researchers have ‘entangled’ two small mechanical drums and precisely measured their linked quantum properties. Entangled pairs like this might someday perform computations and transmit data in large-scale quantum networks.

  • Open source tool can help identify gerrymandering in voting maps
    on May 6, 2021 at 2:54 pm

    Researchers describe the improved mathematical methodology of an open source tool called Gerrychain, which can help observers detect gerrymandering in a voting district plan by creating an ensemble of alternate maps that also meet legal voting criteria.

  • Open source tool can help identify gerrymandering in voting maps
    on May 6, 2021 at 2:54 pm

    Researchers describe the improved mathematical methodology of an open source tool called Gerrychain, which can help observers detect gerrymandering in a voting district plan by creating an ensemble of alternate maps that also meet legal voting criteria.

  • An uncrackable combination of invisible ink and artificial intelligence
    on May 5, 2021 at 3:13 pm

    Coded messages in invisible ink sound like something only found in espionage books, but in real life, they can have important security purposes. Yet, they can be cracked if their encryption is predictable. Now, researchers have printed complexly encoded data with normal ink and a carbon nanoparticle-based invisible ink, requiring both UV light and a computer that has been taught the code to reveal the correct messages.

  • Algorithms improve how we protect our data
    on May 4, 2021 at 3:26 pm

    Scientists have developed algorithms that more efficiently measure how difficult it would be for an attacker to guess secret keys for cryptographic systems. The approach could reduce the computational complexity needed to validate encryption security.

  • When will your elevator arrive? Two physicists do the math
    on May 3, 2021 at 2:47 pm

    The human world is, increasingly, an urban one — and that means elevators. Two physicists saw this as an opportunity to explore the factors that determine elevator transport capabilities in a new article.

  • High vaccination rate is key to future course of COVID-19 pandemic, computer modeling shows
    on April 29, 2021 at 4:33 pm

    Data scientists who developed highly accurate computer modeling to predict trends for COVID-19 cases nationwide have new research that shows how important a high rate of vaccination is to reducing case numbers and controlling the pandemic.

  • Finding the optimal way to repay student debt
    on April 29, 2021 at 4:33 pm

    Though legislative reform is necessary to combat the growing burden of student loan debt in the U.S. on a grand scale, individual borrowers can take steps to repay their loans with as low long-term costs as possible. A new mathematical model develops a strategy for minimizing the overall cost of repaying student loans.

  • Finding the optimal way to repay student debt
    on April 29, 2021 at 4:33 pm

    Though legislative reform is necessary to combat the growing burden of student loan debt in the U.S. on a grand scale, individual borrowers can take steps to repay their loans with as low long-term costs as possible. A new mathematical model develops a strategy for minimizing the overall cost of repaying student loans.

  • New computer model helps brings the sun into the laboratory
    on April 28, 2021 at 5:55 pm

    Every day, the sun ejects large amounts of a hot particle soup known as plasma toward Earth where it can disrupt telecommunications satellites and damage electrical grids. Now, scientists have made a discovery that could lead to better predictions of this space weather and help safeguard sensitive infrastructure.

  • New computer model helps brings the sun into the laboratory
    on April 28, 2021 at 5:55 pm

    Every day, the sun ejects large amounts of a hot particle soup known as plasma toward Earth where it can disrupt telecommunications satellites and damage electrical grids. Now, scientists have made a discovery that could lead to better predictions of this space weather and help safeguard sensitive infrastructure.

  • Silicon could be a photonics game-changer
    on April 27, 2021 at 5:55 pm

    New research has shown that silicon could be one of the most powerful materials for photonic informational manipulation – opening up new possibilities for the production of lasers and displays.

  • Simple robots, smart algorithms
    on April 24, 2021 at 1:07 am

    Inspired by a theoretical model of particles moving around on a chessboard, new robot swarm research shows that, as magnetic interactions increase, dispersed ‘dumb robots’ can abruptly gather in large, compact clusters to accomplish complex tasks. Researchers report that these ‘BOBbots’ (behaving, organizing, buzzing bots) are also capable of collectively clearing debris that is too heavy for one alone to move, thanks to a robust algorithm.

  • Simple robots, smart algorithms
    on April 24, 2021 at 1:07 am

    Inspired by a theoretical model of particles moving around on a chessboard, new robot swarm research shows that, as magnetic interactions increase, dispersed ‘dumb robots’ can abruptly gather in large, compact clusters to accomplish complex tasks. Researchers report that these ‘BOBbots’ (behaving, organizing, buzzing bots) are also capable of collectively clearing debris that is too heavy for one alone to move, thanks to a robust algorithm.

  • Simple robots, smart algorithms
    on April 24, 2021 at 1:07 am

    Inspired by a theoretical model of particles moving around on a chessboard, new robot swarm research shows that, as magnetic interactions increase, dispersed ‘dumb robots’ can abruptly gather in large, compact clusters to accomplish complex tasks. Researchers report that these ‘BOBbots’ (behaving, organizing, buzzing bots) are also capable of collectively clearing debris that is too heavy for one alone to move, thanks to a robust algorithm.

  • Machine learning model generates realistic seismic waveforms
    on April 22, 2021 at 10:18 pm

    A new machine-learning model that generates realistic seismic waveforms will reduce manual labor and improve earthquake detection, according to a new study.

  • Artificial intelligence model predicts which key of the immune system opens the locks of coronavirus
    on April 22, 2021 at 1:39 pm

    A new artificial intelligence (AI) method is helping researchers link immune cells to their targets and, for example, uncouple which white blood cells recognize SARS-CoV-2. The tool has broad applications in understanding the function of the immune system in infections, autoimmune disorders, and cancer.

  • Designing healthy diets with computer analysis
    on April 20, 2021 at 10:31 pm

    A new mathematical model for the interaction of bacteria in the gut could help design new probiotics and specially tailored diets to prevent diseases.

  • Designing healthy diets with computer analysis
    on April 20, 2021 at 10:31 pm

    A new mathematical model for the interaction of bacteria in the gut could help design new probiotics and specially tailored diets to prevent diseases.

  • Research breakthrough in understanding how neural systems process and store information
    on April 14, 2021 at 7:49 pm

    Scientists have made a breakthrough in the quest to better understand how neural systems are able to process and store information.

  • Auxin makes the spirals in gerbera inflorescences follow the Fibonacci sequence
    on April 14, 2021 at 3:34 pm

    The meristem of the gerbera is patterned on the molecular level already at a stage where no primordia or other changes are discernible by even an electron microscope.

  • Auxin makes the spirals in gerbera inflorescences follow the Fibonacci sequence
    on April 14, 2021 at 3:34 pm

    The meristem of the gerbera is patterned on the molecular level already at a stage where no primordia or other changes are discernible by even an electron microscope.

  • Machine learning can help slow down future pandemics
    on April 13, 2021 at 3:41 pm

    Artificial intelligence could be one of the keys for limiting the spread of infection in future pandemics. In a new study, researchers have investigated how machine learning can be used to find effective testing methods during epidemic outbreaks, thereby helping to better control the outbreaks.

  • New approach to centuries-old ‘three-body problem’
    on April 13, 2021 at 3:41 pm

    The “three-body problem,” the term coined for predicting the motion of three gravitating bodies in space, is essential for understanding a variety of astrophysical processes as well as a large class of mechanical problems, and has occupied some of the world’s best physicists, astronomers and mathematicians for over three centuries. Their attempts have led to the discovery of several important fields of science; yet its solution remained a mystery.

  • New approach to centuries-old ‘three-body problem’
    on April 13, 2021 at 3:41 pm

    The “three-body problem,” the term coined for predicting the motion of three gravitating bodies in space, is essential for understanding a variety of astrophysical processes as well as a large class of mechanical problems, and has occupied some of the world’s best physicists, astronomers and mathematicians for over three centuries. Their attempts have led to the discovery of several important fields of science; yet its solution remained a mystery.

  • Combining mask wearing, social distancing suppresses COVID-19 virus spread
    on April 13, 2021 at 3:06 pm

    Studies show wearing masks and social distancing can contain the spread of the COVID-19 virus, but their combined effectiveness is not precisely known. In a new study, researchers developed a network model to study the effects of these two measures on the spread of airborne diseases like COVID-19. The model shows viral outbreaks can be prevented if at least 60 percent of a population complies with both measures.

  • Basketball Mathematics scores big at inspiring kids to learn
    on April 13, 2021 at 12:14 pm

    New study with 756 1st through 5th graders demonstrates that a six-week mashup of hoops and math has a positive effect on their desire to learn more, provides them with an experience of increased self-determination and grows math confidence among youth.

  • Basketball Mathematics scores big at inspiring kids to learn
    on April 13, 2021 at 12:14 pm

    New study with 756 1st through 5th graders demonstrates that a six-week mashup of hoops and math has a positive effect on their desire to learn more, provides them with an experience of increased self-determination and grows math confidence among youth.

  • Basketball Mathematics scores big at inspiring kids to learn
    on April 13, 2021 at 12:14 pm

    New study with 756 1st through 5th graders demonstrates that a six-week mashup of hoops and math has a positive effect on their desire to learn more, provides them with an experience of increased self-determination and grows math confidence among youth.

  • Do school-based interventions help improve reading and math in at-risk children?
    on April 7, 2021 at 12:36 pm

    School-based interventions that target students with, or at risk of, academic difficulties in kindergarten to grade 6 have positive effects on reading and mathematics, according to a new article.

  • Do school-based interventions help improve reading and math in at-risk children?
    on April 7, 2021 at 12:36 pm

    School-based interventions that target students with, or at risk of, academic difficulties in kindergarten to grade 6 have positive effects on reading and mathematics, according to a new article.

  • Do school-based interventions help improve reading and math in at-risk children?
    on April 7, 2021 at 12:36 pm

    School-based interventions that target students with, or at risk of, academic difficulties in kindergarten to grade 6 have positive effects on reading and mathematics, according to a new article.

  • Understanding fruit fly behavior may be next step toward autonomous vehicles
    on April 6, 2021 at 5:19 pm

    With over 70% of respondents to a AAA annual survey on autonomous driving reporting they would fear being in a fully self-driving car, makers like Tesla may be back to the drawing board before rolling out fully autonomous self-driving systems. But new research shows us we may be better off putting fruit flies behind the wheel instead of robots.

  • Dynamic model of SARS-CoV-2 spike protein reveals potential new vaccine targets
    on April 1, 2021 at 7:13 pm

    A new, detailed model of the surface of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein reveals previously unknown vulnerabilities that could inform development of vaccines.

  • First-of-its-kind mechanical model simulates bending of mammalian whiskers
    on April 1, 2021 at 7:13 pm

    Researchers have developed a new mechanical model that simulates how whiskers bend within a follicle in response to an external force, paving the way toward better understanding of how whiskers contribute to mammals’ sense of touch.

  • Kumon or Montessori? It may depend on your politics, according to new study of 8,500 parents
    on March 30, 2021 at 9:10 pm

    Whether parents prefer a conformance-oriented or independence-oriented supplemental education program for their children depends on political ideology, according to a study of more than 8,500 American parents.

  • Big data tells story of diversity, migration of math’s elite
    on March 30, 2021 at 4:13 pm

    Research uses artificial intelligence to map connections between the world’s top mathematicians.

  • Big data tells story of diversity, migration of math’s elite
    on March 30, 2021 at 4:13 pm

    Research uses artificial intelligence to map connections between the world’s top mathematicians.

  • Big data tells story of diversity, migration of math’s elite
    on March 30, 2021 at 4:13 pm

    Research uses artificial intelligence to map connections between the world’s top mathematicians.

  • New statistical method eases data reproducibility crisis
    on March 30, 2021 at 12:12 pm

    A reproducibility crisis is ongoing in scientific research, where many studies may be difficult or impossible to replicate and thereby validate, especially when the study involves a very large sample size. Now researchers have developed a statistical tool that can accurately estimate the replicability of a study, thus eliminating the need to duplicate the work and effectively mitigating the reproducibility crisis.

  • Mathematical modeling used to analyze dynamics of CAR T-cell therapy
    on March 29, 2021 at 4:29 pm

    Researchers use mathematical modeling to help explain why CAR T cells work in some patients and not in others.

  • Mathematical modeling used to analyze dynamics of CAR T-cell therapy
    on March 29, 2021 at 4:29 pm

    Researchers use mathematical modeling to help explain why CAR T cells work in some patients and not in others.

  • More than words: Using AI to map how the brain understands sentences
    on March 23, 2021 at 7:07 pm

    New research involving neuroimaging and A.I., describes the complex network within the brain that comprehends the meaning of a spoken sentence.

  • Its curvature foreshadows the next financial bubble
    on March 22, 2021 at 1:37 pm

    A new paper sheds light on the higher-order architecture of financial systems and allow analysts to identify systemic risks like market bubbles or crashes.

  • Its curvature foreshadows the next financial bubble
    on March 22, 2021 at 1:37 pm

    A new paper sheds light on the higher-order architecture of financial systems and allow analysts to identify systemic risks like market bubbles or crashes.

  • New statistical model predicts which cities could become ‘superspreaders’
    on March 18, 2021 at 6:25 pm

    Researchers have developed a new statistical model that predicts which cities are more likely to become infectious disease hotspots, based both on interconnectivity between cities and the idea that some cities are more suitable environments for infection than others.

  • New statistical model predicts which cities could become ‘superspreaders’
    on March 18, 2021 at 6:25 pm

    Researchers have developed a new statistical model that predicts which cities are more likely to become infectious disease hotspots, based both on interconnectivity between cities and the idea that some cities are more suitable environments for infection than others.

  • Identifying cells to better understand healthy and diseased behavior
    on March 17, 2021 at 6:17 pm

    Neuroscientists, using existing tools such as graphical models, can better identify cells in the brain. The algorithm has major implications for developmental diseases like Alzheimer’s since once scientists can understand the mechanism of a disease, they can find interventions. The algorithm greatly accelerates the speed of analyzing whole-brain data and supports crowdsourcing where the larger neuroscience community can test the algorithm and build atlases.

  • Identifying cells to better understand healthy and diseased behavior
    on March 17, 2021 at 6:17 pm

    Neuroscientists, using existing tools such as graphical models, can better identify cells in the brain. The algorithm has major implications for developmental diseases like Alzheimer’s since once scientists can understand the mechanism of a disease, they can find interventions. The algorithm greatly accelerates the speed of analyzing whole-brain data and supports crowdsourcing where the larger neuroscience community can test the algorithm and build atlases.

  • Patient wait times reduced thanks to new study by engineers
    on March 16, 2021 at 10:36 pm

    The first known study to explore optimal outpatient exam scheduling given the flexibility of inpatient exams has resulted in shorter wait times for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

  • Second-wave COVID mortality dropped markedly in (most) wealthier zones
    on March 16, 2021 at 3:23 pm

    Mathematical analysis of COVID mortality rates in the United States and Europe shows that second-wave mortality was often greatly reduced — particularly in wealthier European countries and the northeast of the U.S.

  • Second-wave COVID mortality dropped markedly in (most) wealthier zones
    on March 16, 2021 at 3:23 pm

    Mathematical analysis of COVID mortality rates in the United States and Europe shows that second-wave mortality was often greatly reduced — particularly in wealthier European countries and the northeast of the U.S.

  • Internet-access spending improves academic outcomes, according to study of Texas public schools
    on March 15, 2021 at 8:07 pm

    Increased internet-access spending by Texas public schools improved academic performance but also led to more disciplinary problems among students, a study of 9,000 schools shows.

  • Faster drug discovery through machine learning
    on March 15, 2021 at 5:21 pm

    Researchers have developed DeepBAR, a machine learning technique that quickly calculates drug molecules’ binding affinity with target proteins. The advance could accelerate drug discovery and protein engineering.

  • Researchers enhance Alzheimer’s disease classification through artificial intelligence
    on March 15, 2021 at 3:02 pm

    Warning signs for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) can begin in the brain years before the first symptoms appear. Spotting these clues may allow for lifestyle changes that could possibly delay the disease’s destruction of the brain.

  • Standard vital signs could help estimate people’s pain levels
    on March 11, 2021 at 8:27 pm

    A new study demonstrates that machine-learning strategies can be applied to routinely collected physiological data, such as heart rate and blood pressure, to provide clues about pain levels in people with sickle cell disease.

  • Standard vital signs could help estimate people’s pain levels
    on March 11, 2021 at 8:27 pm

    A new study demonstrates that machine-learning strategies can be applied to routinely collected physiological data, such as heart rate and blood pressure, to provide clues about pain levels in people with sickle cell disease.

  • Sum of cubes: New math solution for 3
    on March 11, 2021 at 7:22 pm

    After cracking the ‘sum of cubes’ puzzle for 42, mathematicians discover a new solution for 3.

  • Sum of cubes: New math solution for 3
    on March 11, 2021 at 7:22 pm

    After cracking the ‘sum of cubes’ puzzle for 42, mathematicians discover a new solution for 3.

  • Read to succeed — in math; study shows how reading skill shapes more than just reading
    on March 11, 2021 at 7:20 pm

    These findings clearly demonstrate how the cooperative areas of the brain responsible for reading skill are also at work during apparently unrelated activities, such as multiplication, suggest that reading, writing and arithmetic, the foundational skills informally identified as the three Rs, might actually overlap in ways not previously imagined, let alone experimentally validated.

  • Read to succeed — in math; study shows how reading skill shapes more than just reading
    on March 11, 2021 at 7:20 pm

    These findings clearly demonstrate how the cooperative areas of the brain responsible for reading skill are also at work during apparently unrelated activities, such as multiplication, suggest that reading, writing and arithmetic, the foundational skills informally identified as the three Rs, might actually overlap in ways not previously imagined, let alone experimentally validated.

  • Classic math conundrum solved: Superb algorithm for finding the shortest route
    on March 11, 2021 at 1:42 am

    One of the most classic algorithmic problems deals with calculating the shortest path between two points. A more complicated variant of the problem is when the route traverses a changing network – whether this be a road network or the internet. For 40 years, an algorithm has been sought to provide an optimal solution to this problem. Now, computer scientist have come up with a recipe.

  • Large computer language models carry environmental, social risks
    on March 10, 2021 at 8:04 pm

    Computer engineers at the world’s largest companies and universities are using machines to scan through tomes of written material. The goal? Teach these machines the gift of language. Do that, some even claim, and computers will be able to mimic the human brain. But this impressive compute capability comes with real costs, including perpetuating racism and causing significant environmental damage, according to a new paper, ”On the Dangers of Stochastic Parrots: Can Language Models Be Too Big? ?”

  • Key task in computer vision and graphics gets a boost
    on March 5, 2021 at 3:03 pm

    A researcher has devised a way to speed up a fundamental task in computer vision and graphics known as non-rigid point set registration. Unlike previous registration techniques, the proposed method is computationally efficient even for large data sets. Moreover, the computing times for this method are shorter than those for a state-of-the-art approach. The results of this study could have implications for various fields, such as autonomous driving, medical imaging, and robotic manipulation.

  • A new strategy for pooling COVID-19 tests to detect outbreaks early
    on March 4, 2021 at 7:48 pm

    Researchers have proposed a new quantitative strategy for pooling COVID-19 tests in order to monitor spread and detect outbreaks early within closed communities, such as nursing homes or universities.

  • Vaccine development software shows promise in influenza effort, could help defeat coronavirus
    on March 2, 2021 at 2:40 pm

    A novel computer algorithm that could create a broadly reactive influenza vaccine for swine flu also offers a path toward a pan-influenza vaccine and possibly a pan-coronavirus vaccine as well, according to a new paper.

  • In era of online learning, new testing method aims to reduce cheating
    on March 1, 2021 at 6:38 pm

    Engineers demonstrate how a testing strategy they call ‘distanced online testing’ can effectively reduce students’ ability to receive help from one another in order to score higher on a test taken at individual homes during social distancing.

  • Early-warning for seizures could be a game-changer for epilepsy patients
    on February 26, 2021 at 3:38 pm

    A research team has developed mathematical model to predict seizures that will give epilepsy patients an accurate warning five minutes to one hour before they are likely to experience a seizure.

  • Early-warning for seizures could be a game-changer for epilepsy patients
    on February 26, 2021 at 3:38 pm

    A research team has developed mathematical model to predict seizures that will give epilepsy patients an accurate warning five minutes to one hour before they are likely to experience a seizure.

  • First complete coronavirus model shows cooperation
    on February 25, 2021 at 10:16 pm

    Multiscale coarse-grained model of complete SARS-CoV-2 virion developed for first time using supercomputers. Cooperative motion of coronavirus spike protein simulations likely informative of how virus explores and detects ACE2 receptors of potential host cell. Frontera supercomputer at TACC generated all-atom simulations of coronavirus spike protein system that fed into coarse-grained model. Whole coronavirus model provides iterative platform useful for design of safer, better medicines to treat and prevent COVID-19.

  • Laser system generates random numbers at ultrafast speeds
    on February 25, 2021 at 7:37 pm

    Scientists have developed a system that can generate random numbers over a hundred times faster than current technologies, paving the way towards faster, cheaper, and more secure data encryption in today’s digitally connected world.

  • AI identifies social bias trends in Bollywood, Hollywood movies
    on February 25, 2021 at 4:32 pm

    An automated computer analysis method designed by Carnegie Mellon University computer scientists makes it possible to track social biases across decades of Bollywood and Hollywood movies.

  • Scientists begin building highly accurate digital twin of our planet
    on February 24, 2021 at 5:03 pm

    A digital twin of our planet is being designed to simulate Earth’s climate system reaching into the future. It is a tool to support policy-?makers in taking appropriate measures to better prepare for extreme events.

  • Game theory may be useful in explaining and combating viruses
    on February 24, 2021 at 12:24 am

    A team of researchers concludes that a game-theory approach may offer new insights into both the spread and disruption of viruses, such as SARS-CoV-2. Its work applies a ‘signaling game’ to an analysis of cellular processes in illuminating molecular behavior.

  • Machine learning aids in simulating dynamics of interacting atoms
    on February 23, 2021 at 9:44 pm

    A revolutionary machine-learning (ML) approach to simulate the motions of atoms in materials such as aluminum is described.

  • Lack of symmetry in qubits can’t fix errors in quantum computing, might explain matter/antimatter
    on February 22, 2021 at 9:41 pm

    A team of quantum theorists seeking to cure a basic problem with quantum annealing computers — they have to run at a relatively slow pace to operate properly — found something intriguing instead.

  • Explainable AI for decoding genome biology
    on February 18, 2021 at 8:11 pm

    Researchers have developed advanced explainable artificial intelligence (AI) in a technical tour de force to decipher regulatory instructions encoded in DNA.

  • Engineers place molecule-scale devices in precise orientation
    on February 18, 2021 at 7:28 pm

    A technique for controlling the orientation of manufactured DNA shapes now removes one of the last barriers for the combination of molecular devices with conventional semiconductor chips.

  • Mathematical modeling to identify factors that determine adaptive therapy success
    on February 16, 2021 at 4:51 pm

    Researchers report results from their study using mathematical modeling to show that cell turnover impacts drug resistance and is an important factor that governs the success of adaptive therapy.

  • Mathematical modeling to identify factors that determine adaptive therapy success
    on February 16, 2021 at 4:51 pm

    Researchers report results from their study using mathematical modeling to show that cell turnover impacts drug resistance and is an important factor that governs the success of adaptive therapy.

  • New physics rules tested on quantum computer
    on February 15, 2021 at 2:24 pm

    Simulation of non-Hermitian quantum mechanics using a quantum computer goes beyond centuries old conventions.

  • Applying quantum computing to a particle process
    on February 12, 2021 at 2:41 pm

    Researchers used a quantum computer to successfully simulate an aspect of particle collisions that is typically neglected in high-energy physics experiments, such as those that occur at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider.

  • Mathematical modeling suggests kids half as susceptible to COVID-19 as adults
    on February 11, 2021 at 7:44 pm

    A new computational analysis suggests that people under the age of 20 are about half as susceptible to COVID-19 infection as adults, and they are less likely to infect others.

  • Mathematical modeling suggests kids half as susceptible to COVID-19 as adults
    on February 11, 2021 at 7:44 pm

    A new computational analysis suggests that people under the age of 20 are about half as susceptible to COVID-19 infection as adults, and they are less likely to infect others.

  • Computational medicine: Moving from uncertainty to precision
    on February 10, 2021 at 8:33 pm

    An innovative partnership takes aim at medicine down to the individual level by applying state-of-the-art computation to medical care.

  • Computational medicine: Moving from uncertainty to precision
    on February 10, 2021 at 8:33 pm

    An innovative partnership takes aim at medicine down to the individual level by applying state-of-the-art computation to medical care.

  • A language learning system that pays attention — more efficiently than ever before
    on February 10, 2021 at 6:34 pm

    A hardware and software system called SpAtten streamlines state-of-the-art natural language processing. The advance could reduce the computing power, energy, and time required for text analysis and generation.

  • New mathematical method for generating random connected networks
    on February 10, 2021 at 6:33 pm

    Many natural and human-made networks, such as computer, biological or social networks have a connectivity structure that critically shapes their behavior. The academic field of network science is concerned with analyzing such real-world complex networks and understanding how their structure influences their function or behavior. Examples are the vascular network of our bodies, the network of neurons in our brain, or the network of how an epidemic is spreading through a society.

  • Placing cosmological constraints on quantum gravity phenomenology
    on February 10, 2021 at 6:33 pm

    Researchers have used well-established cosmological observations to place tighter constraints on the quadratic model of the Generalized Uncertainty Principle, while discrediting the linear model.

  • Placing cosmological constraints on quantum gravity phenomenology
    on February 10, 2021 at 6:33 pm

    Researchers have used well-established cosmological observations to place tighter constraints on the quadratic model of the Generalized Uncertainty Principle, while discrediting the linear model.

  • AI can predict early death risk
    on February 9, 2021 at 4:39 pm

    Researchers have found that a computer algorithm developed using echocardiogram videos of the heart can predict mortality within a year. The algorithm — an example of what is known as machine learning, or artificial intelligence (AI) — outperformed other clinically used predictors, including pooled cohort equations and the Seattle Heart Failure score.

  • Severe undercounting of COVID-19 cases in U.S., other countries estimated via model
    on February 8, 2021 at 7:24 pm

    A new machine-learning framework uses reported test results and death rates to calculate estimates of the actual number of current COVID-19 infections within all 50 U.S. states and 50 countries.

  • The Ramanujan Machine: Researchers develop ‘conjecture generator’
    on February 5, 2021 at 3:42 pm

    Using AI and computer automation, researchers have developed a ‘conjecture generator’ that creates mathematical conjectures, which are considered to be the starting point for developing mathematical theorems.

  • The Ramanujan Machine: Researchers develop ‘conjecture generator’
    on February 5, 2021 at 3:42 pm

    Using AI and computer automation, researchers have developed a ‘conjecture generator’ that creates mathematical conjectures, which are considered to be the starting point for developing mathematical theorems.

  • The Ramanujan Machine: Researchers develop ‘conjecture generator’
    on February 5, 2021 at 3:42 pm

    Using AI and computer automation, researchers have developed a ‘conjecture generator’ that creates mathematical conjectures, which are considered to be the starting point for developing mathematical theorems.

  • State-funded pre-K may enhance math achievement
    on February 3, 2021 at 7:46 pm

    Students who attend the Georgia Prekindergarten Program are more likely to achieve in mathematics than those who do not attend pre-K, according to a new study.

  • Desktop PCs run simulations of mammals’ brains
    on February 2, 2021 at 4:37 pm

    Academics have established a method of turbocharging desktop PCs to give them the same capability as supercomputers worth tens of millions of pounds.

  • Detecting fake news designed to manipulate stock markets
    on February 1, 2021 at 7:49 pm

    Social media is increasingly used to spread fake news. The same problem can be found on the capital market – criminals spread fake news about companies in order to manipulate share prices. Researchers have developed an approach that can recognize such fake news, even when the news contents are repeatedly adapted.

  • Solving complex physics problems at lightning speed
    on February 1, 2021 at 2:08 pm

    A calculation so complex that it takes twenty years to complete on a powerful desktop computer can now be done in one hour on a regular laptop. Physicists have now designed a new method to calculate the properties of atomic nuclei incredibly quickly.

  • A NEAT reduction of complex neuronal models accelerates brain research
    on January 27, 2021 at 7:00 pm

    Unlike their simple counterparts in artificial intelligence (AI) applications, neurons in the brain use dendrites – their intricate tree-like branches – to find relevant chunks of information. Now, neuroscientists have discovered a new computational method to make complex dendrite models much simpler. These faithful reductions may lead AI applications to process information much like the brain does.

  • A NEAT reduction of complex neuronal models accelerates brain research
    on January 27, 2021 at 7:00 pm

    Unlike their simple counterparts in artificial intelligence (AI) applications, neurons in the brain use dendrites – their intricate tree-like branches – to find relevant chunks of information. Now, neuroscientists have discovered a new computational method to make complex dendrite models much simpler. These faithful reductions may lead AI applications to process information much like the brain does.

  • Pace of prehistoric human innovation could be revealed by ‘linguistic thermometer’
    on January 27, 2021 at 1:52 pm

    A physics professor has joined forces with language experts to build a ‘linguistic thermometer’ that can record the temperature of ‘hot’ or ‘cold’ (ie fast or slow) developments in modern linguistic features to create a computer-based model that can provide a better understanding of the development in human language and innovation stretching back to pre-history.

  • Pace of prehistoric human innovation could be revealed by ‘linguistic thermometer’
    on January 27, 2021 at 1:52 pm

    A physics professor has joined forces with language experts to build a ‘linguistic thermometer’ that can record the temperature of ‘hot’ or ‘cold’ (ie fast or slow) developments in modern linguistic features to create a computer-based model that can provide a better understanding of the development in human language and innovation stretching back to pre-history.

  • To find the right network model, compare all possible histories
    on January 27, 2021 at 1:52 pm

    Scientists rarely have the historical data they need to see exactly how nodes in a network became connected. But a new article offers hope for reconstructing the missing information, using a new method to evaluate the rules that generate network models.

  • To find the right network model, compare all possible histories
    on January 27, 2021 at 1:52 pm

    Scientists rarely have the historical data they need to see exactly how nodes in a network became connected. But a new article offers hope for reconstructing the missing information, using a new method to evaluate the rules that generate network models.

  • To find the right network model, compare all possible histories
    on January 27, 2021 at 1:52 pm

    Scientists rarely have the historical data they need to see exactly how nodes in a network became connected. But a new article offers hope for reconstructing the missing information, using a new method to evaluate the rules that generate network models.

  • Domino effects and synchrony in seizure initiation
    on January 26, 2021 at 12:18 am

    In a brain with a neurological disorder like epilepsy, synchronization between groups of neurons can grow to a dangerous extent when a collection of brain cells begins to emit excess electricity. Researchers used a mathematical model to explore the interplay between neurons that leads to these transitions in synchronization during the onset of seizures.

  • Domino effects and synchrony in seizure initiation
    on January 26, 2021 at 12:18 am

    In a brain with a neurological disorder like epilepsy, synchronization between groups of neurons can grow to a dangerous extent when a collection of brain cells begins to emit excess electricity. Researchers used a mathematical model to explore the interplay between neurons that leads to these transitions in synchronization during the onset of seizures.

  • Why older adults must go to the front of the vaccine line
    on January 21, 2021 at 8:09 pm

    A new global, mathematical modeling study shows that in most cases prioritizing older adults for COVID-19 vaccines saves the most lives. It also found that, in some cases, more lives could be saved and infections prevented if those who’ve already tested positive step to the back of the line.

  • Why older adults must go to the front of the vaccine line
    on January 21, 2021 at 8:09 pm

    A new global, mathematical modeling study shows that in most cases prioritizing older adults for COVID-19 vaccines saves the most lives. It also found that, in some cases, more lives could be saved and infections prevented if those who’ve already tested positive step to the back of the line.

  • Mathematical framework enables accurate characterization of shapes
    on January 21, 2021 at 6:21 pm

    In nature, many things have evolved that differ in size, color and, above all, in shape. While the color or size of an object can be easily described, the description of a shape is more complicated. Researchers have now outlined a new and improved way to describe shapes based on a network representation that can also be used to reassemble and compare shapes.

  • Constructing termite turrets without a blueprint
    on January 20, 2021 at 12:43 am

    Following a series of studies on termite mound physiology and morphogenesis over the past decade, researchers have now developed a mathematical model to help explain how termites construct their intricate mounds.

  • Researchers build models using machine learning technique to enhance predictions of COVID-19 outcomes
    on January 18, 2021 at 4:31 pm

    Researchers have published one of the first studies using federated learning to examine electronic health records to better predict how COVID-19 patients will progress.

  • Model analyzes how viruses escape the immune system
    on January 14, 2021 at 9:39 pm

    MIT researchers have devised a way to computationally model viral escape, using models that were originally developed to model language. The model can predict which sections of viral surface proteins, including those of influenza, HIV, and SARS-CoV-2, are more likely to mutate in a way that allows the virus to evade the human immune system. It can also identify sections that are less likely to mutate, making them good targets for new vaccines.

  • Deep learning outperforms standard machine learning in biomedical research applications
    on January 14, 2021 at 6:01 pm

    Compared to standard machine learning models, deep learning models are largely superior at discerning patterns and discriminative features in brain imaging, despite being more complex in their architecture.

  • Researchers use deep learning to identify gene regulation at single-cell level
    on January 13, 2021 at 2:09 pm

    Researchers describe how they developed a deep-learning framework to observe gene regulation at the cellular level.

  • A bit too much: Reducing the bit width of Ising models for quantum annealing
    on January 6, 2021 at 2:53 pm

    Quantum annealers are devices that physically implement a quantum system called the ‘Ising model’ to solve combinatorial optimization problems. However, the coefficients of the Ising model often require a large bit width, making it difficult to implement physically. Now, scientists demonstrate a method to reduce the bit width of any Ising model, increasing the applicability and versatility of quantum annealers in many fields, including cryptography, logistics, and artificial intelligence.

  • Mathematical modeling can help balance economy, health during pandemic
    on December 24, 2020 at 4:31 pm

    Using mathematical modeling, new interdisciplinary research determines the best course of action when it comes to walking the line between economic stability and the best possible health outcomes.

  • Traditional model for disease spread may not work in COVID-19
    on December 21, 2020 at 6:42 pm

    A mathematical model that can help project the contagiousness and spread of infectious diseases like the seasonal flu may not be the best way to predict the continuing spread of the novel coronavirus, especially during lockdowns that alter the normal mix of the population.

  • Traditional model for disease spread may not work in COVID-19
    on December 21, 2020 at 6:42 pm

    A mathematical model that can help project the contagiousness and spread of infectious diseases like the seasonal flu may not be the best way to predict the continuing spread of the novel coronavirus, especially during lockdowns that alter the normal mix of the population.

  • To the brain, reading computer code is not the same as reading language
    on December 15, 2020 at 6:12 pm

    Neuroscientists have found reading computer code does not rely on the regions of the brain involved in language processing. Instead, it activates the ‘multiple demand network,’ which is also recruited for complex cognitive tasks such as solving math problems or crossword puzzles.

  • To the brain, reading computer code is not the same as reading language
    on December 15, 2020 at 6:12 pm

    Neuroscientists have found reading computer code does not rely on the regions of the brain involved in language processing. Instead, it activates the ‘multiple demand network,’ which is also recruited for complex cognitive tasks such as solving math problems or crossword puzzles.

  • Like adults, children by age 3 prefer seeing fractal patterns
    on December 11, 2020 at 6:55 pm

    By the time children are 3 years old they already have an adult-like preference for visual fractal patterns commonly seen in nature, according to researchers.

  • New computational method validates images without ‘ground truth’
    on December 11, 2020 at 4:55 pm

    Researchers have developed a computational method that allows them to determine not if an entire imaging picture is accurate, but if any given point on the image is probable, based on the assumptions built into the model.

  • The ever-elusive riddle: What’s the best way to cut Christmas cookies?
    on December 7, 2020 at 3:20 pm

    At some point in life, most people have stood over a rolled-out slab of cookie dough and pondered just how to best cut out cookies with as little waste as possible. Now, even math experts have given up on finding a computer algorithm to answer this type of geometric problem.

  • Quantum magic squares
    on November 24, 2020 at 5:29 pm

    The magic of mathematics is particularly reflected in magic squares. Recently, quantum physicists and mathematicians introduced the notion of the quantum magic square, and for the first time studied in detail the properties of this quantum version of magic squares.

  • Biophysics: Geometry supersedes simulations
    on November 20, 2020 at 6:26 pm

    Physicists have introduced a new method that allows biological pattern-forming systems to be systematically characterized with the aid of mathematical analysis. The trick lies in the use of geometry to characterize the dynamics.

  • A biochemical random number
    on November 20, 2020 at 4:38 pm

    Scientists have generated a huge true random number using DNA synthesis. It is the first time that a number of this magnitude has been created by biochemical means.

  • Time to rethink predicting pandemic infection rates?
    on November 17, 2020 at 4:31 pm

    In a new article, a physicist explains how he combined math in the form of Tchebychev’s inequality with a statistical ensemble to understand how macroscopic exponential growth with different daily rates arise from person-to-person disease infection.

  • Computer scientists launch counteroffensive against video game cheaters
    on November 16, 2020 at 5:56 pm

    Computer scientists have devised a new weapon against video game players who cheat. The researchers developed their approach for detecting cheaters using the popular first-person shooter game Counter-Strike. But the mechanism can work for any massively multiplayer online (MMO) game that sends data traffic to a central server.

  • COVID-19 ‘super-spreading’ events play outsized role in overall disease transmission
    on November 2, 2020 at 10:32 pm

    Researchers find COVID-19 super-spreading events, in which one person infects more than six other people, are much more frequent than anticipated, and that they have an outsized contribution to coronavirus transmission.

  • COVID-19 ‘super-spreading’ events play outsized role in overall disease transmission
    on November 2, 2020 at 10:32 pm

    Researchers find COVID-19 super-spreading events, in which one person infects more than six other people, are much more frequent than anticipated, and that they have an outsized contribution to coronavirus transmission.

  • Forecasting elections with a model of infectious diseases
    on October 28, 2020 at 9:14 pm

    Election forecasting is an innately challenging endeavor, with results that can be difficult to interpret and may leave many questions unanswered after close races unfold. Researchers have now borrowed ideas from epidemiology to develop a new method for forecasting elections. The team hoped the multidisciplinary nature of their infectious disease model could expand the community that engages with polling data and raise research questions from a new perspective.

  • Random effects key to containing epidemics
    on October 27, 2020 at 3:12 pm

    Scientists have discovered why dividing a large population into multiple subpopulations that do not intermix can help contain outbreaks without imposing contact restrictions within those local communities.

  • Divide and conquer: A new formula to minimize mathematics anxiety
    on October 26, 2020 at 1:54 pm

    Mathematics — it’s the subject some kids love to hate. Yet despite its lack of popularity, mathematics is critical for a STEM-capable workforce and vital for current and future productivity. New research finds that boosting student confidence in mathematics is pivotal to greater engagement with the subject.

  • How genetic variation gives rise to differences in mathematical ability
    on October 22, 2020 at 6:45 pm

    DNA variation in a gene called ROBO1 is associated with early anatomical differences in a brain region that plays a key role in quantity representation, potentially explaining how genetic variability might shape mathematical performance in children, according to a new study.

  • Novel method for measuring spatial dependencies turns less data into more data
    on October 21, 2020 at 6:09 pm

    Researcher makes ‘little data’ act big through, the application of mathematical techniques normally used for time-series, to spatial processes.

  • Mass screening method could slash COVID-19 testing costs, trial finds
    on October 21, 2020 at 3:32 pm

    Using a new mathematical approach to screen large groups for COVID-19 could be around 20 times cheaper than individual testing, a study suggests.

  • A new approach to artificial intelligence that builds in uncertainty
    on October 19, 2020 at 4:55 pm

    Artificial intelligence isn’t perfect. In fact, it’s only as good as the methods and data built into it. Researchers have detailed a new approach to artificial intelligence that builds uncertainty, error, physical laws, expert knowledge and missing data into its calculations and leads ultimately to much more trustworthy models.

  • Researchers discover a uniquely quantum effect in erasing information
    on October 16, 2020 at 2:09 pm

    Researchers have discovered a uniquely quantum effect in erasing information that may have significant implications for the design of quantum computing chips. Their surprising discovery brings back to life the paradoxical ‘Maxwell’s demo’, which has tormented physicists for over 150 years.

  • ‘Universal law of touch’ will enable new advances in virtual reality
    on October 9, 2020 at 8:24 pm

    Seismic waves, commonly associated with earthquakes, have been used by scientists to develop a universal scaling law for the sense of touch. A team used Rayleigh waves to create the first scaling law for touch sensitivity.

  • Researchers use artificial intelligence language tools to decode molecular movements
    on October 9, 2020 at 12:49 pm

    Researchers used language processing AI to turn molecular movements into stories that reveal what forms a protein can take and how and when it changes form — key information for understanding disease and developing targeted therapeutics.

  • Study uses mathematical modeling to identify an optimal school return approach
    on October 7, 2020 at 10:23 pm

    A new mathematical model has been developed to identify the number of days students could attend school to allow them a better learning experience while mitigating infections of COVID-19.

  • Faster COVID-19 testing with simple algebraic equations
    on October 7, 2020 at 4:30 pm

    A mathematician has developed a new method for processing large volumes of COVID-19 tests which he believes could lead to significantly more tests being performed at once and results being returned much quicker.

  • Mathematical modelling to prevent fistulas
    on September 17, 2020 at 2:53 pm

    It is better to invest in measures that make it easier for women to visit a doctor during pregnancy than measures to repair birth injuries. This is the conclusion from mathematicians, using Uganda as an example.

  • A new method for directed networks could help multiple levels of science
    on September 9, 2020 at 12:05 am

    Researchers reveal a new method for analyzing hierarchies in complex networks and illustrate it by applications to economics, language and gene expression.

  • The mathematical values of Linear A fraction signs
    on September 8, 2020 at 3:32 pm

    A recent study has shed new light on the Minoan system of fractions, one of the outstanding enigmas tied to the ancient writing of numbers.

  • Battery-free Game Boy runs forever
    on September 3, 2020 at 9:14 pm

    Researchers develop first-ever battery-free, energy-harvesting, interactive device. And it looks and feels like a retro 8-bit Nintendo Game Boy.

  • New mathematical method shows how climate change led to fall of ancient civilization
    on September 3, 2020 at 2:56 pm

    A researcher developed a mathematical method that shows climate change likely caused the rise and fall of an ancient civilization. A new article outlines the technique he developed and shows how shifting monsoon patterns led to the demise of the Indus Valley Civilization, a Bronze Age civilization contemporary to Mesopotamia and ancient Egypt.

  • Revolutionary quantum breakthrough paves way for safer online communication
    on September 2, 2020 at 7:21 pm

    The world is one step closer to having a totally secure internet and an answer to the growing threat of cyber-attacks, thanks to a team of international scientists who have created a unique prototype which could transform how we communicate online.

  • Using math to examine the sex differences in dinosaurs
    on August 27, 2020 at 12:07 am

    When you only have fossils to go off of, it’s hard to tell which dinosaur traits, like size and ornamentation, are related to the animals’ sex, and which traits are related to other things like age. But a new kind of statistical analysis can often estimate the degree of sexual variation in a dataset of fossils.

  • Thermodynamics of computation: A quest to find the cost of running a Turing machine
    on August 26, 2020 at 9:56 pm

    Turing machines are widely believed to be universal, in the sense that any computation done by any system can also be done by a Turing machine. In a new article, researchers present their work exploring the energetic costs of computation within the context of Turing machines.

  • Fifty new planets confirmed in machine learning first
    on August 25, 2020 at 3:06 pm

    Fifty potential planets have had their existence confirmed by a new machine learning algorithm.

  • Skat and poker: More luck than skill?
    on August 21, 2020 at 2:38 pm

    Chess requires playing ability and strategic thinking; in roulette, chance determines victory or defeat, gain or loss. But what about skat and poker? Are they games of chance or games of skill in game theory? This classification also determines whether play may involve money. Economists have studied this question and developed a rating system similar to the Elo system used for chess.

  • Brain-NET, a deep learning methodology, accurately predicts surgeon certification scores based on neuroimaging data
    on August 11, 2020 at 4:50 pm

    Researchers demonstrated how a deep learning framework they call ‘Brain-NET’ can accurately predict a person’s level of expertise in terms of their surgical motor skills, based solely on neuroimaging data.

  • Language may undermine women in science and tech
    on August 3, 2020 at 4:01 pm

    Researchers examined gender stereotypes baked into 25 languages to explore why fewer women enter science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields.

  • Randomness theory could hold key to internet security
    on July 27, 2020 at 11:47 pm

    Researchers identified a problem that holds the key to whether all encryption can be broken — as well as a surprising connection to a mathematical concept that aims to define and measure randomness.

  • More realistic computer graphics
    on July 24, 2020 at 6:10 pm

    New software techniques make lighting in computer-generated images look more realistic for use in video games, extended reality, and scientific visualization tools.

  • Links between video games and gambling run deeper than previously thought, study reveals
    on July 14, 2020 at 2:12 pm

    A new study suggests that a number of practices in video games, such as token wagering, real-money gaming, and social casino spending, are significantly linked to problem gambling.

  • Consumers prefer round numbers even when the specific number is better news
    on July 6, 2020 at 6:08 pm

    Consider this scenario: A vaccine for the novel coronavirus has been developed that is 91.27% effective. If public health officials present this information using the specific number, people are likely to think the vaccine is actually less effective than if it is presented as being 90% effective. This concept is a real-life application of recent findings from Gaurav Jain, an assistant professor of marketing in the Lally School of Management at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, published recently in Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Process.

  • Smokers good at math are more likely to want to quit
    on June 22, 2020 at 1:50 pm

    For smokers who are better at math, the decision to quit just adds up, a new study suggests. Researchers found that smokers who scored higher on a test of math ability were more likely than others to say they intended to quit smoking.

  • Achievement isn’t why more men are majoring in physics, engineering and computer science
    on June 18, 2020 at 7:02 pm

    Researchers have found that the reason there are more undergraduate men than women majoring in physics, engineering and computer science is not because men are higher achievers. On the contrary, the scholars found that men with very low high-school GPAs in math and science and very low SAT math scores were choosing these math-intensive majors just as often as women with much higher math and science achievement.

  • What do ‘Bohemian Rhapsody,’ ‘Macbeth,’ and a list of Facebook friends all have in common?
    on June 16, 2020 at 5:57 pm

    A new study shows how vastly complex communication networks can efficiently convey large amounts of information to the human brain. Researcher found that works of literature, musical pieces, and social networks have a similar underlying structure that allows them to share information rapidly and effectively.

  • AI sentencing tools need to be closely scrutinized
    on June 9, 2020 at 5:00 pm

    Judges should closely vet the AI tools they use to help them predict whether a defendant is likely to re offend, urges a new study.

  • Limits on evolution revealed by statistical physics
    on May 29, 2020 at 7:06 pm

    What is and is not possible for natural evolution may be explained using models and calculations from theoretical physics, say researchers. To explain this the limits of evolution, researchers simplified the natural world to fit idealized physics models and searched for any mathematical structure within biological complexity.

  • Solution to century-old math problem could predict transmission of infectious diseases
    on May 29, 2020 at 7:06 pm

    An academic has achieved a milestone in statistical/mathematical physics by solving a 100-year-old physics problem — the discrete diffusion equation in finite space.

  • New model predicts the peaks of the COVID-19 pandemic
    on May 29, 2020 at 7:06 pm

    Researchers describe a single function that accurately describes all existing available data on active COVID-19 cases and deaths — and predicts forthcoming peaks.

  • High variability is result of complex data workflows
    on May 20, 2020 at 11:12 pm

    A new study offers new evidence that the complexity of contemporary analytical methods in science contributes to the variability of research outcomes.

  • New study estimates the odds of life and intelligence emerging beyond our planet
    on May 18, 2020 at 8:26 pm

    Despite knowing when life first appeared on Earth, scientists still do not understand how life occurred, which has important implications for the likelihood of finding life elsewhere in the universe. A new paper shows how an analysis using a statistical technique called Bayesian inference could shed light on how complex extraterrestrial life might evolve in alien worlds.

  • Is video game addiction real?
    on May 13, 2020 at 6:38 pm

    A recent six-year study, the longest study ever done on video game addiction, found that about 90% of gamers do not play in a way that is harmful or causes negative long-term consequences. A significant minority, though, can become truly addicted to video games and as a result can suffer mentally, socially and behaviorally.

  • Identifying light sources using artificial intelligence
    on May 5, 2020 at 4:16 pm

    Identifying sources of light plays an important role in the development of many photonic technologies, such as lidar, remote sensing, and microscopy. Traditionally, identifying light sources as diverse as sunlight, laser radiation, or molecule fluorescence has required millions of measurements, particularly in low-light environments, which limits the realistic implementation of quantum photonic technologies. Researchers demonstrated a smart quantum technology that enables a dramatic reduction in the number of measurements required to identify light sources.

  • Identifying light sources using artificial intelligence
    on May 5, 2020 at 4:16 pm

    Identifying sources of light plays an important role in the development of many photonic technologies, such as lidar, remote sensing, and microscopy. Traditionally, identifying light sources as diverse as sunlight, laser radiation, or molecule fluorescence has required millions of measurements, particularly in low-light environments, which limits the realistic implementation of quantum photonic technologies. Researchers demonstrated a smart quantum technology that enables a dramatic reduction in the number of measurements required to identify light sources.

  • What is an individual? Information Theory may provide the answer
    on April 16, 2020 at 1:19 pm

    Despite the near-universal assumption of individuality in biology, there is little agreement about what individuals are and few rigorous quantitative methods for their identification. A new approach may solve the problem by defining individuals in terms of informational processes.

  • Psychiatry: Five clearly defined patterns
    on February 25, 2020 at 3:50 pm

    Psychiatrists have used a computer-based approach to assign psychotic patients diagnosed as bipolar or schizophrenic to five different subgroups. The method could lead to better therapies for psychoses.

  • New artificial intelligence algorithm better predicts corn yield
    on February 20, 2020 at 6:05 pm

    With some reports predicting the precision agriculture market will reach $12.9 billion by 2027, there is an increasing need to develop sophisticated data-analysis solutions that can guide management decisions in real time. A new study offers a promising approach to efficiently and accurately process precision agricultural data.

  • Mixed-signal hardware security thwarts powerful electromagnetic attacks
    on February 19, 2020 at 2:25 pm

    A team has developed technology to use mixed-signal circuits to embed critical information that is suppressed at a lower level.

  • Storytelling can reduce VR cybersickness
    on February 13, 2020 at 2:07 pm

    A storyline with emotionally evocative details can reduce virtual reality cybersickness for some people, according to a new study. Researchers found that storylines that provide context and details can help users feel immersed in VR experiences and can reduce feelings of nausea, disorientation and eye strain, depending on a user’s gaming experience.

  • Apps could take up less space on your phone, thanks to new ‘streaming’ software
    on February 6, 2020 at 11:43 pm

    New software ‘streams’ data and code resources to an app from a cloud server when necessary, allowing the app to use only the space it needs on a phone at any given time.

  • Enjoying the View? How computer games can help evaluate landscapes
    on February 6, 2020 at 6:23 pm

    Geographers are stepping into the virtual world of computer games to develop exciting new ways of assessing landscapes. Researchers have spent years analyzing geographical landscapes and determining what features people from different countries find most appealing. In a bid to engage younger audiences the team created a series of videos depicting dynamic fly-throughs of virtual landscapes.

  • Supercomputers help link quantum entanglement to cold coffee
    on January 31, 2020 at 5:56 pm

    Theoretical physicists have found a deep link between one of the most striking features of quantum mechanics — quantum entanglement — and thermalization, which is the process in which something comes into thermal equilibrium with its surroundings.

  • First all-optical, stealth encryption technology developed
    on January 29, 2020 at 2:14 pm

    Engineers are introducing the first all-optical “stealth” encryption technology that will be significantly more secure and private for highly sensitive cloud-computing and data center network transmission.

  • How human social structures emerge
    on January 21, 2020 at 4:30 pm

    What rules shaped humanity’s original social networks? The earliest social networks were tightly knit cultural groups made of multiple biologically related families. That single group would then develop relationships with other cultural groups in their local area. Researchers used statistical physics and computer models common in evolutionary biology to explain the origin of common community structures documented by cultural anthropologists around the world.

  • Nearly 9 in 10 parents say teens spend too much time gaming
    on January 20, 2020 at 4:34 pm

    Eighty-six percent of parents agree that teens spend too much time gaming, but many may be mistaken about the extent of their own child’s video game habits, a new national poll suggests.

  • Mathematicians put famous Battle of Britain ‘what if’ scenarios to the test
    on January 9, 2020 at 6:02 pm

    Mathematicians have developed a new model to explore what the impact of changes to Luftwaffe tactics would actually have been. Their approach uses statistical modelling to calculate how the Battle might have played out if history had followed one of several alternative courses.

  • Indeterminist physics for an open world
    on January 7, 2020 at 3:49 pm

    Classical physics is characterized by the equations describing the world. Yet our day-to-day experience is struck by this deterministic vision of the world. A physicist has been analyzing the classical mathematical language used in modern physics. He has thrown light on a contradiction between the equations that explained the phenomena and the finite world. He suggests making changes to the mathematical language to allow randomness and indeterminism to become part of classical physics.

  • An algorithm for large-scale genomic analysis
    on December 20, 2019 at 3:56 pm

    The examination of Haplotypes makes it possible to understand the heritability of certain complex traits. However, genome analysis of family members is usually necessary, a tedious and expensive process. Researchers have developed SHAPEIT4, a powerful computer algorithm that allows the haplotypes of hundreds of thousands of unrelated individuals to be identified very quickly. Results are as detailed as when family analysis is performed. Their tool is available online under an open source license.

  • Smaller class sizes not always better for pupils, multinational study shows
    on December 16, 2019 at 1:11 am

    A new statistical analysis of data from a long-term study on the teaching of mathematics and science has found that smaller class sizes are not always associated with better pupil performance and achievement.

  • Computer game may help to predict reuse of opioids
    on December 8, 2019 at 2:21 pm

    A computer betting game can help predict the likelihood that someone recovering from opioid addiction will reuse the pain-relieving drugs, a new study shows.

  • Deep learning to analyze neurological problems
    on November 21, 2019 at 7:13 pm

    Getting to the doctor’s office for a check-up can be challenging for someone with a neurological disorder that impairs their movement, such as a stroke. But what if the patient could just take a video clip of their movements with a smart phone and forward the results to their doctor?

  • Brains of girls and boys are similar, producing equal math ability
    on November 8, 2019 at 12:48 pm

    New research comprehensively examined the brain development of young boys and girls. Their research shows no gender difference in brain function or math ability.

  • In classical and quantum secure communication practical randomness is incomplete
    on November 4, 2019 at 4:28 pm

    Random bit sequences are key ingredients of various tasks in modern life and especially in secure communication. In a new study researchers have determined that generating true random bit sequences, classical or quantum, is an impossible mission. Based on these findings, they have demonstrated a new method of classified secure communication.

  • Escapism: A powerful predictor of internet gaming disorder among video gamers
    on October 22, 2019 at 4:11 pm

    A new study is the first to compare professional electronic sport (esport) players with recreational video game players and explores the similarities and differences between what motivates each group. While the two groups are psychosocially different, they found that both esport and recreational gamers run the risk of developing internet gaming disorder when their intense immersion in the activity is tied to escapism.

  • New CRISPR genome editing system offers a wide range of versatility in human cells
    on October 21, 2019 at 4:45 pm

    A team has developed a new CRISPR genome-editing approach by combining two of the most important proteins in molecular biology — CRISPR-Cas9 and a reverse transcriptase — into a single machine.

  • Prevention better than cure at preventing young users from getting involved in cybercrime
    on October 21, 2019 at 12:27 pm

    Highly-targeted messaging campaigns from law enforcement can be surprisingly effective at dissuading young gamers from getting involved in cybercrime, a new study has suggested.

  • Information theory as a forensics tool for investigating climate mysteries
    on October 17, 2019 at 11:55 am

    During Earth’s last glacial period, temperatures on the planet periodically spiked dramatically and rapidly. A new article suggests that mathematics from information theory could offer a powerful tool for analyzing and understanding these mysterious events.

  • Combination of techniques could improve security for IoT devices
    on October 10, 2019 at 8:48 pm

    A multi-pronged data analysis approach that can strengthen the security of Internet of Things (IoT) devices — such as smart TVs, home video cameras and baby monitors — against current risks and threats has been created.

  • Addictive de-vices: How we can unplug from this 21st century epidemic
    on October 3, 2019 at 1:20 pm

    We spend our days looking at them, talking to them, and touching them. They increasingly consume our time, attention and money. We are addicted to our digital devices — or, more precisely, the digital experiences they give us. A study analyzed the growing problem with digital addiction and how marketers as well as app developers contribute to this 21st-century phenomenon.

  • New research analyzes video game player engagement
    on September 25, 2019 at 5:36 pm

    In the video game industry, the ability for gaming companies to track and respond to gamers’ post-purchase play opens up new opportunities to enhance gamer engagement and retention and increase video game revenue.

  • Scientists one step closer to a fully functioning quantum computer
    on September 25, 2019 at 5:13 pm

    Quantum computing has the potential to revolutionize technology, medicine, and science by providing faster and more efficient processors, sensors, and communication devices. But transferring information and correcting errors within a quantum system remains a challenge. Researchers now demonstrate a new method of relaying information by transferring the state of electrons. The research brings scientists one step closer to creating fully functional quantum computers.

  • Better way to teach physics to university students
    on September 25, 2019 at 4:04 pm

    Physicists and educators have developed a curriculum for college-level students that shows promise in helping students in introductory physics classes further practice and develop their calculus skills.

  • Artificial intelligence probes dark matter in the universe
    on September 18, 2019 at 2:02 pm

    Physicists and computer scientists have developed a new approach to the problem of dark matter and dark energy in the universe. Using machine learning tools, they programmed computers to teach themselves how to extract the relevant information from maps of the universe.

  • Research advances noise cancelling for quantum computers
    on September 16, 2019 at 12:14 pm

    The characterization of complex noise in quantum computers is a critical step toward making the systems more precise.

  • African American bachelor’s degrees see growth, behind in physical sciences, engineering
    on September 12, 2019 at 5:44 pm

    African Americans are seeing growth in engineering and physical sciences but are not progressing at the same rate when compared to the general population. A report examined the number of bachelor’s degrees earned from 2005 to 2015.

  • African American bachelor’s degrees see growth, behind in physical sciences, engineering
    on September 12, 2019 at 5:44 pm

    African Americans are seeing growth in engineering and physical sciences but are not progressing at the same rate when compared to the general population. A report examined the number of bachelor’s degrees earned from 2005 to 2015.

  • Good at math? It means little if you’re not confident
    on September 9, 2019 at 7:42 pm

    Being good at math relates to better financial and medical outcomes — unless you don’t have confidence in your own abilities with numbers, new research suggests. In two studies, researchers found that the key to success in personal finances and dealing with a complex disease was a match between a person’s math abilities and how comfortable and assured he or she felt using those skills.

  • The ever-winning lottery ticket: Mathematicians solve a dusty mystery
    on September 9, 2019 at 2:45 pm

    After years of work, mathematics researchers have answered a mysterious half-century-old riddle. The mystery was all but forgotten until a Danish researcher heard about, and then decided to tackle it.

  • Sum of three cubes for 42 finally solved — using real life planetary computer
    on September 6, 2019 at 5:40 pm

    Hot on the heels of the ground-breaking ‘Sum-Of-Three-Cubes’ solution for the number 33, mathematicians have solved the final piece of the famous 65-year-old math puzzle with an answer for the most elusive number of all – 42.

  • Personality and motivation in relation to internet gaming disorder
    on September 5, 2019 at 12:00 pm

    A new study examining the relationships among personality, motivation, and internet gaming disorder (IGD) found that predictors of IGD include male gender, neurotic and introverted personality traits, and motivation related to achievement.

  • Customers feel more accomplished when progress tracked in round numbers
    on August 21, 2019 at 1:59 pm

    The study shows reaching a goal expressed in round numbers results in higher levels of customer satisfaction. That was particularly true when the final goal was still distant. Hitting intermediate targets expressed as round numbers increased customers’ feeling of progress at low levels of achievement.

  • We like our math like we like our art: Beautiful
    on August 9, 2019 at 7:59 pm

    A beautiful landscape painting, a beautiful piano sonata — art and music are almost exclusively described in terms of aesthetics, but what about math? Beyond useful or brilliant, can an abstract idea be considered beautiful?

  • Mathematicians develop new statistical indicator
    on August 9, 2019 at 3:30 pm

    Up to now, it has taken a great deal of computational effort to detect dependencies between more than two high-dimensional variables, in particular when complicated non-linear relationships are involved. Mathematicians have now developed a dependence measure called ‘distance multivariance’.

  • Top tools for pinpointing genetic drivers of disease
    on July 25, 2019 at 2:04 pm

    A new benchmarking study has determined the best analysis tools for identifying errors in a patient’s DNA that are responsible for driving disease. Being able to pinpoint these ‘genomic rearrangements’ is vital for understanding how illnesses occur, and therefore, how best to treat them.

  • Myth-busting study reveals that gamblers can’t detect slot machine payout percentages
    on July 15, 2019 at 8:16 pm

    It’s a common sight on casino floors: patrons jumping from slot machine to slot machine before eventually hunkering down at a game that’s due for the next big payout. But can players — even the regulars who frequent a particular property — really tell the difference between the house edge on one game from that of another? Nope. At least not according to a series of recent studies led by a college professor and former gaming industry operations analyst.

  • Deep learning-powered ‘DeepEC’ helps accurately understand enzyme functions
    on July 9, 2019 at 3:02 pm

    Researchers have shown that a deep learning-powered computational framework enables the high-quality and high-throughput prediction of enzyme commission numbers, which is essential for the accurate understanding of enzyme functions.

  • Want to boost creativity? Try playing Minecraft
    on July 8, 2019 at 6:00 pm

    Video games that foster creative freedom can increase creativity under certain conditions, according to new research. The experimental study compared the effect of playing Minecraft, with or without instruction, to watching a TV show or playing a race car video game. Those given the freedom to play Minecraft without instruction were most creative.

  • Optimal models of thermodynamic properties
    on June 26, 2019 at 8:03 pm

    Researchers are beginning to employ Bayesian methods in developing optimal models of thermodynamic properties. Research focused on hafnium (Hf), a metal emerging as a key component in computer electronics.

  • Understanding brain activity when you name what you see
    on June 24, 2019 at 6:04 pm

    Using complex statistical methods and fast measurement techniques, researchers found how the brain network comes up with the right word and enables us to say it.

  • Play games with no latency
    on June 24, 2019 at 3:10 pm

    One of the most challenging issues for game players looks to be resolved soon with the introduction of a zero-latency gaming environment. A team has now developed technology that helps game players maintain zero-latency performance. The new technology transforms the shapes of game design according to the amount of latency.

  • Do video games drive obesity?
    on June 17, 2019 at 3:05 pm

    Are children, teenagers and adults who spend a lot of time playing video games really more obese? A meta study has looked into this question. The cliché is true — but only for adults.

  • Could playing computer games improve your peripheral vision?
    on June 12, 2019 at 3:01 pm

    Researchers have found a significant improvement in the peripheral awareness of people who played computer games specially designed around using peripheral vision. This finding opens up the possibility that these types of games can be used to help improve players’ performance in team sports – so they can spot team-mates quicker – or to help them to identify potential hazards at the side of their vision.

  • Decoding Beethoven’s music style using data science
    on June 6, 2019 at 7:02 pm

    What makes Beethoven sound like Beethoven? Researchers have completed a first analysis of Beethoven’s writing style, applying statistical techniques to unlock recurring patterns.

  • Bees can link symbols to numbers, study finds
    on June 5, 2019 at 9:14 pm

    We know bees get the concept of zero and can do basic math. Now researchers have discovered they may also be capable of connecting symbols to numbers. It’s a finding that sheds new light on how numerical abilities may have evolved over millennia and even opens new possibilities for communication between humans and other species.

  • From viruses to social bots, researchers unearth the structure of attacked networks
    on May 29, 2019 at 5:12 pm

    Researchers have developed a machine learning model of the invisible networks around us including, how viruses interact with proteins and genes in the body. Their work, they believe, can help across the disciplines from the design of future medicines or gene therapies against viruses and diseases like cancer or help understand how to address cyber attacks.

  • Phase transitions: The math behind the music
    on May 23, 2019 at 1:25 pm

    Physics Professor Jesse Berezovsky contends that until now, much of the thinking about math and music has been a top-down approach, applying mathematical ideas to existing musical compositions as a way of understanding already existing music. He contends he’s uncovering the ’emergent structures of musical harmony’ inherent in the art, just as order comes from disorder in the physical world. He believes that could mean a whole new way of looking at music of the past, present and future.

  • A simple, yet versatile, new design for chaotic oscillating circuitry inspired by prime numbers
    on May 22, 2019 at 12:15 pm

    Researchers have found a simple, yet highly versatile, way to generate ‘chaotic signals’ with various features. The technique consists of interconnecting three ‘ring oscillators,’ effectively making them compete against each other, while controlling their respective strengths and their linkages. The resulting device is rather small and efficient, thus suitable for emerging applications such as realizing wireless networks of sensors.

  • Mathematicians revive abandoned approach to Riemann Hypothesis
    on May 21, 2019 at 8:24 pm

    Many ways to approach the Riemann Hypothesis have been proposed during the past 150 years, but none of them have led to conquering the most famous open problem in mathematics. A new article suggests that one of these old approaches is more practical than previously realized.

  • Statistical model could predict future disease outbreaks
    on May 21, 2019 at 4:46 pm

    Researchers have created a statistical method that may allow public health and infectious disease forecasters to better predict disease reemergence, especially for preventable childhood infections such as measles and pertussis.

  • New all-fiber device simplifies free-space based quantum key distribution
    on May 6, 2019 at 4:41 pm

    Researchers have developed a simple and stable device to generate the quantum states necessary for quantum key distribution. The device could make it more practical to develop a global data network that uses this very secure method of encryption to protect everything from credit card transactions to texts.

  • Coincidence helps with quantum measurements
    on April 18, 2019 at 6:17 pm

    Through randomly selected measurements, physicists can determine the quantum entanglement of many-particle systems. With the newly developed method, quantum simulations can be extended to a larger number of quantum particles. Researchers now report on the first successful demonstration of this method.

  • Study finds natural variation in sex ratios at birth and sex ratio inflation in 12 countries
    on April 16, 2019 at 5:20 pm

    Biostatisticians have developed a new estimation method for assessing natural variations in the sex ratio at birth (SRB) for all countries in the world.

  • Scientists build a machine to see all possible futures
    on April 12, 2019 at 1:47 pm

    Researchers have implemented a prototype quantum device that can generate and analyze a quantum superposition of possible futures. Using a novel quantum algorithm, the possible outcomes of a decision process are encoded as a superposition of different photon locations. Using interferometry, the team show that it is possible to conduct a search through the set of possible futures without looking at each future individually.

  • The cost of computation
    on April 8, 2019 at 8:16 pm

    There’s been a rapid resurgence of interest in understanding the energy cost of computing. Recent advances in this ‘thermodynamics of computation’ are now summarized.

  • Artificial intelligence can predict premature death, study finds
    on March 27, 2019 at 6:20 pm

    Computers which are capable of teaching themselves to predict premature death could greatly improve preventative healthcare in the future, a new study suggests

  • New computational tool could change how we study pathogens
    on March 25, 2019 at 2:14 pm

    A sophisticated new analysis too incorporating advanced mathematical strategies could help revolutionize the way researchers investigate the spread and distribution of dangerous, fast-evolving disease vectors.